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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
's that you attended and where the crowd sizes? guest: my first one was 1977, jimmy carter. i was a 20-year-old political science major and it was already on my bucket list to go to the inauguration. host: it was the last one on the east front of the capital. guest: absolutely. i think about the difference, maybe not so much the crowds. but it is the security situation. at that time, i stayed in a hotel on pennsylvania avenue. a friend had come with me. i think we just walked straight up pennsylvania avenue. i am not even sure we had a ticket. we stood behind the east front of the capitol and had a very good view. host: you could see the president directly. guest: absolutely. we were very close. after that, we just ran from the east front down it to pennsylvania avenue, a constitution, and watched the parade. so we got to see jimmy carter. he walked. we were so shocked and thrilled to see him do that, and part of the whole ceremony to me is the combination of pomp and populism. jimmy carter had that touch. host: professor lusane, you have written about african-americans in their american ex
.w. bush, aren't attending this inaugural. president -- former president bill clinton and jimmy carter are. we are waiting to see president clinton. stand by for that. also taking a closer look at the downside of winning another four years of the white house. it doesn't always go so well. the second-term curse, as some call it. that's coming up as well. first, though, inaugural flashback. >> let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. >> we all remember the phrase the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. but even more important than the phrase was the whole attitude that fdr had. he projected optimism and projected forward movement. people felt that's the mystery of leadership, that somehow the depression they were suffering, they weren't going to be alone anymore. they had a leader who was going to take care of it. when you have diabetes... your doctor will say get smart about your weight. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood sugar spikes. [ male announcer ] g
companies to invest here is one of his priorities. >> there's former president jimmy carter and his wife. immediately before them, as you might have heard, melissa harris perry, jay-z. it's jay-z and beyonce is doing the national anthem. she did "america the beautiful" at the inaugural concert in 2009 but she will be at the main event singing right after the president's speech today. what you're looking at here, the motorcade here, the giant motorcade is heading into the immediate area of the inaugural platform outside the u.s. capitol. starting with ronald reagan in the 1980s, the inaugurations since then have all happened on the west front of the capitol, which is a very dramatic sight as you see there, looking down the mall toward the west front. there's an array of flags that will be on the stage. you can see there up in the upper left-hand corner of the screen, you see the five flags? the center flag is the american flag as it is now. the betsy ross flag is on the outside, the first one in, the second one and the fourth one, those are the flags that are not usually flown anywhere re
-span crew and a visual blog page all at c-span .org. jimmy carter was inaugurated in 1977. he defeated gerald ford. following president carter's swearing in he walked the entire length of the parade route in about 40 minutes. here's his remark from the podium which are about 15 minutes. >> are you prepared to take the constitutional oath? >> i am. >> place your left hand on the bible and raise your right hand. >> i will to the best of myability >> will to the best of my ability. >> preserve, property and defend. >> the constitution of the united states. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> congratulations. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the united states. [applause] >> for myself and for our nation, i want to thank my predecessor for all he has done to heal our land. [applause] in this outward and physical ceremony, we attest once again to the inner and spiritual strength of our nation. as my high school teacher, miss julia coleman, used to say, "we must adjust to changing times and still hold to unchanging principles." here before me is the bible used in the
for sure, but we thing he will get out and walk around and it will be a great moment, right? >> jimmy carter back in 197 literally stepped foot outside the capitol and walk all the way to the white house. no president has since. but every president, along the way, gets out at some point and gets out this and greets the people. does not necessarily go up and shake hands but will get along the route where this president on this parade could get out of couple of times, and as you make that turn from the capitol, and, again,te house. you can hear people cheering now. there are only a couple of people deep right now at this point, but further along the route it could be deeper. back in 2009, you may remember, there were 10, 20, and 30' deep in some cases. it will be interesting to see how many came out for this. >>shepard: i have never seen like the crowds here four years ago. we had to get up at 4:30 in the morning just to make our way from the hotel over here to the reviewment form. it was crazy! who would expect on the second term for there to be that many people. nobody! ask george bus
eisenhower from 1957, harry truman from 1949, then john f. kennedy in 1961. george h.w. bush, jimmy carter and we'll wrap up the night with george w. bush's speech. see ten inaugural speeches from ten past presidents on c-span. >> up next senate his torn don richy gave a historical perspective on inaugurations describing how various treated the day and how so help me god became part of the ceremony. this is about an hour. >> now there is a phrase that journalists use a lot. it's called a go to guy. and i think you know what that means. it means somebody who knows a lot about something that the journalists can go to and get from that person reliable information. and there are not that many go to guys around. there are a lot of people in this town who have opinions. there are a lot of people in this town who are incredibly glib. but there are not that many people who are so fundamentally immersed in a subject. and an important subject that journalists and others, ack demics are attracted to that person. in my mind, the best example of a go to guy is our next speaker don richy. i've gone to h
. this is something he could strike. the only inaugural address i had a chance to work on, jimmy carter's, the main thing people remember that, the opening line, thanking gerald ford for what he had done to bring the country together after the trauma of watergate. >> the democratic grace is important. the one contrast when ulysses grant gave his inaugural, used the end of the speech to tell how badly treated he had been and claim vindication in the election. >> does a speechwriter write a draft and the president marks it up, sends it back? does the president write the first draft or sketch out an outline and speechwriter fills in the blanks? >> it's different for each president and circumstance. the worst speeches are always the state of the union addresses because everybody sees them coming a year in advance. by four years into the administration with a president who is a known accomplished writer and somebody who is proud and pride full of his literary accomplishments i'm sure he's had ideas for this. >> and close to his own speechwriter who has been with him a long time, they have a good relatio
. john f. kennedy from 1961. george h. w. bush from 1989. lyndon johnson from 1965. jimmy carter from 1977. george w. bush from 2001. starting at 8 p.m. eastern on c- span. >> why did you write a book about your experience? >> i felt that the perspective should be brought to bear. there were some things that i felt were not completely accurate. i thought it was important for the story will -- but historical record. people need to understand their different policy options and disagreements. if you want to prevent this crisis from happening again, the public itself needs to engage more on financial reform and educate themselves. i tried to make the book accessible. i hope people will look into it. >> sheila bair on the government's role in that worst financial crisis. sunday night at 8 p.m. on c- span's "q&a." >> kent conrad and judd gregg talked about ways to balance the federal budget. they spoke for just under an hour at this event hosted by the u.s. chamber of commerce. [applause] >> first senator gregg. >> thank you, marc. i appreciate that. that was quite an introduction. it is fr
to the president. we just saw 88-year-old jimmy carter arriving on the scene. former presidents are almost always in attendance at these events, but today, george herbert walker bush and his son, george w. bush are not in attendance. the elder mr. bush has recently been released from a month-long stay in the hospital due to a respiratory ailment and so both bush families announced that they would not be able to attend because of the poor health of the elder george bush. the president after taking the oath of office will deliver his second inaugural address. following that, kelly clarkson will be singing "my country 'tis of thee." and these are the supreme court justices being led in, led by chief justice of the united states john roberts jr. who delivered the oath in 2009. here is the first lady as she is coming in to the capitol. as we mentioned earlier, she's wearig a dress and a coat by the american designer thom browne. navy blue we are told. there's justice sotomayor. nominated to the supreme court by president obama. she will deliver the oath of office to the vice president. justice elena k
john f. kennedy, george h.w. bush, lyndon johnson, president jimmy carter and we'll wrap up the night at 11 eastern with george w. bush's speech. starting tonight at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> why did you write a book about your experience? >> it was an important part of history. i felt it should be brought to bear. there had been some other accounts of the crisis i thought were not completely accurate in terms of what we did and what i did. so i thought it was important for the historical record to present our perspective and for people to understand there were different policy choices and options, disagreements. and that if we want to prevent another crisis from happening again, i really felt the public itself needed to engage more on financial reform, educate themselves better. make it an issue with their elected officials. so i have some policy recommendations at the end of it that i hope people will look at. >> the former head of the deposit corporation on the government's worst financial crisis. her book is bull by the horns sunday at 8:00 on c-span's q&a. yournl continues.
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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